Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Decompression Aids Spinal Injury Recovery

Done within 24 hours, the procedure improved neurological outcomes a year later


Surgical decompression of the spinal cord involves the removal of various tissue or bone fragments that are being squeezed and comprising the spinal cord. While commonly done after an injury occurs, the timing of the procedure varies widely.

The study looked at 170 patients with cervical spinal cord injuries, graded as A (most several neurological involvement) to D (least severe), who underwent decompression surgery.

Six months after the surgery, 24 percent of the patients who had the surgery within 24 hours showed two-grade or greater improvement in their condition compared with only 4 percent in the group that had the surgery more than a day later.

"The initial results suggest that decompression within 24 hours of injury may be associated with improved neurological recovery at one-year follow-up. However, further recruitment of patients with long-term follow-up is necessary to validate these promising results," study author Michael Fehlings, head of the Krembil Neuroscience Center at the University Health Network in Toronto, said in a prepared statement.

Fehlings was expected to present the findings in Chicago April 28 at the annual meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons.

Every year, almost 12,000 people in the United States and Canada, mostly young adults, sustain a spinal cord injury. Although surgery, such as decompression, can help, these procedures often do not dramatically improve overall recovery and outcome.

"This is an area of medicine that has not seen tremendous scientific advances, so there remains an urgent need to improve upon current interventions to help restore neurological function in patients with acute (spinal cord injury)," said Fehlings, who is also professor of neurosurgery at the University of Toronto.

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Friday, April 18, 2008

New Discovery May Aid Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries

A discovery by researchers at University of Minnesota may provide new insights into how the spinal cord controls walking, and this may pave the way for developing treatments for diseases of the central nervous like Parkinson?s disease and spinal cord injuries.

Led by Joshua Puhl, Ph.D., and Karen Mesce, Ph.D., in the Departments of Entomology and Neuroscience, the study has found a possibility that the human nervous system, within each segment or region of spinal cord, may have its own unit burst generator to control rhythmic movements such as walking.

The researchers chose to study a simpler model of locomotion in the medicinal leech, and this uncovered the residing spots of these unit burst generators and it also showed that each nerve cord segment has a complete generator.

It was discovered that a neuron triggers to set off a chain reaction that gives rise to rhythmic movement and the moment those circuits are turned on, the body essentially goes on autopilot.

The researchers mainly focused on the segmented leech for study as they have fewer and larger neurons, making them easier to study.

For most of us, we can chew gum and walk at the same time. We do not have to remind ourselves to place the right leg out first, bring it back and do the same for the other leg. So how does the nervous system control rhythmic behaviors like walking or crawling, said Mesce.

The study also discovered that dopamine, a common human hormone, can turn each of these complete generator units on.

Because dopamine affects movement in many different animals, including humans, our studies may help to identify treatments for Parkinsons patients and those with spinal cord injury, said Mesce.

The study was published online in the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Tuesday, April 08, 2008

Nanotechnology May Help Reconnect Nerves

U.S. researchers say they have created a nano-engineered gel that can enable severed spinal cord fibers to regenerate and grow.

Mice paralysed by spinal injuries have been able to walk again thanks to a treatment developed by scientists in the US. The therapy uses proteins that self-assemble into nano-fibers at the site of the injury, encouraging nerves to regrow.

Spinal cord injuries often lead to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation because the damaged nerve fibers can't regenerate, Northwestern University scientists said. Although nerve fibers or axons have the capacity to re-grow, they don't because they're blocked by scar tissue that develops around the injury.

The nanogel developed at the university's Feinberg School of Medicine inhibits formation of scar tissue and enables the severed spinal cord fibers to regenerate and grow, the scientists said.

The gel is injected as a liquid into the spinal cord and self-assembles into a scaffold that supports new nerve fibers. When the gel was injected into mice with a spinal cord injury, after six weeks the animals had a greatly enhanced ability to use their hind legs and walk.

"It's important to understand that something that works in mice will not necessarily work in human beings," said study leader Dr. John Kessler, who noted that if the gel is eventually approved for humans, a clinical trial could begin within several years.

The research is reported in the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Monday, April 07, 2008

Experimental Russian Stem Cell Treatments Credited for Woman's Progress

Experimental Russian stem cell treatments for spinal injury credited for woman's progress


Notice: The following excerpts are taken from the Grand Rapids Press. A link the the entire article is listed below, and is well worth the time to read.
When Kadi DeHaan took her first steps in December, two years after a car accident forced her into a wheelchair, she did it in typical Kadi style: low-key, nonchalant and with a confident grin.


Apparently, she knew all along she would walk away from her pink and black wheelchair and her customized leg braces, despite a spinal cord injury at chest level and a grim prognosis that she would never walk again.

It happened after two years of intensive therapy and six trips to Russia, where her stem cells were harvested and then injected into her spinal cord to restore nerves.

Kadi's progress is "very much a unique and wonderful thing," said physical therapist Sandy Burns, director of the Center for Spinal Cord Injury Recovery in Rockford, a clinic affiliated with the Detroit Medical Center.

No one can say for sure if nearly two years of experimental treatments or hours upon hours of physical therapy -- a trio of three-hour sessions every week -- led Kadi to where she is today.

Probably both, said Burns, whose clients sometimes head to Russia or Portugal or China for treatments that aren't approved in the U.S. and generally aren't covered by insurance.

The physical therapy is a very important component, "but it's definitely Russia," that put Kadi back on her own two feet, Kadi's mom, Bonnie, insisted. "There are just too many coincidences. Kadi knows that what she's got she got from Russia."

After fundraising dollars ran out more than a year ago, Kadi's parents took out a loan to pay for the trips to Russia. The three-year protocol recommended by Moscow doctors will cost in excess of $150,000.

At the time, Kadi had just a bit of feeling in her feet and could walk only with lots of help from custom-built leg braces and a walker.

Since then, she's given up the braces and is "tons stronger" and "a lot more independent," she said. She's a full-time student at Davenport University who quaffs Mountain Dew and confesses to sending text messages during class.

"I've seen a lot of changes. I've seen motor return, sensory return, everything," Kadi said.

She's so convinced of the gains made at the NeuroVita Clinic that she's planning her seventh trip there in August. Quite a change of attitude after she declared the first trip "the worst three weeks of my life."

Burns, who is quick to say her clinic does not endorse any of the alternative treatments, acknowledged that the stem cell injections do seem to make a difference, at least for Kadi.

"Folks that have gone there have, I think, consistently reported that they are noticing changes. They are feeling more," Burns said.

She tempers her optimism with the reality of what she sees every day: some of her clients will never accomplish half as much as Kadi has. Progress often depends upon the severity of the spinal injury, not just the region of the spine that was damaged.

That's why Burns doesn't make predictions about what her clients will eventually accomplish. But of course, she hopes Kadi continues to make great strides.




The Neurovita Clinic


Where: Moscow, Russia
What: Treats spinal cord injuries, degenerative disorders and some cancers with patient's own stem cells, which are harvested, grown and re-injected. Clinic moved away from use of embryonic stem cells because of compatibility issues.
Insurance: Because treatment is experimental and not performed here, U.S. insurance policies don't cover it.
Website: neurovita.ru/eng_index.html

The NeuroVita clinic was founded by neurologist Andrey S. Bryukhovetskiy in 2002. It's located on the campus of the Russian State Medical University and can accommodate 35 patients.

The clinic dabbled in embryonic stem cell treatments but now uses only autologous material -- that which is obtained from the patient -- because there are no problems with compatibility, not to mention politics and religion, according to the Web site.

About 11 of every 100 patients with spinal cord injuries walk again after the stem cell treatments, Bryukhovetskiy told them.

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